Living with Osteoporosis

Living with osteoporosis doesn’t have to be a life sentence. There are medications and lifestyle changes available to help you manage your osteoporosis. These can allow you to enjoy an active lifestyle. 

If you feel like you are alone with your osteoporosis, rest assured there are many people going through the same ups and downs you are. You can also contact your local osteoporosis society for support. Read about the experiences of people with osteoporosis from all over the world. 

View frequently asked questions and general questions related to osteoporosis which we have received from around the world.

Read advice and tips about:

Our Bone Health Advocates

Maureen McTeer, medical law specialist, human rights advocate, author, patron of Osteoporosis Canada. Message on the occasion of the 2nd IOF Women Leaders Roundtable, 2006

As patron of Osteoporosis Canada for many years, I am pleased that we have successfully changed the image of osteoporosis as a disease of elderly women, a group who historically have had neither economic nor political clout –to a disease that can strike us all whether we are men or women, young or old.

Kirk Pengilly has been with the band INXS since its founding in 1977

When I found out that I had osteoporosis, I was pretty shocked. I thought it was, you know, for old ladies basically…but I got diagnosed when I was 37. Osteoporosis has affected my life in many ways. Mainly I’m a lot more aware of my health now. I’m aware of just taking it a little more easy with physical activities, I exercise regularly, I gave up smoking… in fact, I probably feel better now than I have ever felt!

Her Majesty Queen Rania, speaking at first IOF Women Leaders Roundtable, May 2002, Lisbon, Portugal

Although we have effective treatments for osteoporosis, each year millions of our grandmothers are crippled and disfigured because they don't have easy and sufficient access to diagnosis and medication.